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FDA has placed mangos from Agricola Daniella on Import Alert after finding “strains of Salmonella in samples of mangos from this producer. This means that Agricola Daniella mangos will be denied entry into the USA unless the importer can prove that the mangos are not contaminated.

Daniella mangos have been linked to an outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup that – as of September 14th – infected 121 people in 15 US states and 21 Canadians (as of August 29th).

The California Department of Public Health, which took the lead in the US outbreak investigation, traced several of the outbreak illnesses back through the supply chain to Agricola Daniella, according to the FDA report. The implicated mangos were imported into the USA by Splendid Products (Burlingame, CA), which recalled the fruit on August 29th. The Canadian importer, North American Produce Sales (Vancouver, BC) announced a recall of the Daniella mangos on August 24th, and expanded the scope of its recall on August 31st.

Various consignees and retailers of the recalled mangos – and of cut fruit products containing the mangos – have issued their own recalls and/or customer alerts. For a consolidated list of recalls and other information on this outbreak, please select the Salmonella Braenderup – Mango tab at the top of this page.

Today’s FDA Press Announcement does not state whether the “strains of Salmonella” found in the Daniella mangos include the Salmonella Braenderup outbreak strain. In response to my question, FDA spokesperson Patricia Al-Hinnawy replied, “…all our information is in the release.” I would interpret this to mean that detailed serotyping and genetic profiling of the Salmonella strains is still in progress.

CDC Advice to Consumers, Retailers and Others (As of September 14, 2012)

Contaminated mangoes may make people sick.

  • CDC recommends that consumers do not eat recalled Daniella brand mangoes distributed by Splendid Products and discard any remaining recalled mangoes. This is especially important for children under the age of 5 years, elderly adults, and people with weak immune systems.
  • Persons who think they might have become ill from eating possibly contaminated mangoes should consult their health care providers.

Contaminated mangoes may still be in grocery stores and in consumers’ homes.

  • Consumers who recently purchased recalled Daniella brand mangoes distributed by Splendid Products are advised not to eat them and discard any remaining recalled mangoes.
  • Even if some of the mango has been eaten without anyone becoming ill, the rest of the mango should be disposed of immediately.
  • When in doubt, throw it out.
  • Recalled mangoes should be disposed of in a closed plastic bag placed in a sealed trash can. This will prevent people or animals from eating them.
  • Retailers and food service operators should not sell or serve recalled Daniella brand mangoes.

For general produce safety advice, visit FDA’s Produce Safety webpage.

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